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Name of Work

Wilson, Dana (1946-)
All Our Yesterdays (2001)

Movements:
Here (in thanks)
There (in memoriam)
Everywhere (in anticipation)

Performances:


Feb 04, 2001



Mathieu Dufour, Flute
Gail Williams, Horn
Christopher Costanza, Cello
Edward Atkatz, Percussion
Larry Combs, Clarinet
Jasmine Lin, Violin
Deborah Sobol, Piano


Feb 05, 2001



Mathieu Dufour, Flute
Gail Williams, Horn
Christopher Costanza, Cello
Allison Attar, Harp
Larry Combs, Clarinet
Jasmine Lin, Violin
Deborah Sobol, Piano

WILSON-All Our Yesterdays

Composed in 1999

Composer, jazz pianist, conductor, and teacher Dana Wilson has received grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the New England Foundation for the Arts, the New York State Arts Council, Arts Midwest, and Meet the Composer; he wrote "All Our Yesterdays" on commission for CCM's MUSIC AT THE MILLENNIUM project. His works have been performed throughout the United States, Europe, and East Asia; a new trumpet piece was recently premiered in Russia, his new saxophone quartet will shortly be introduced to audiences in Japan, and performances of some of his earlier works are upcoming in venues that include Carnegie Hall. Mr. Wilson holds a doctorate from the Eastman School of Music and is currently on the music faculty at Ithaca College.

Mr. Wilson has said that "All Our Yesterdays" is intended "as a humble tribute to many of the musicians who have contributed to the esthetic discourse, and cultural thrusts that have become a part of our heritage and helped us understand who we are. To reflect the broad spectrum of those musics, the movements are titled respectively 'Here,' 'There,' and 'Everywhere.’” (There's also a faint reference to the Beatles here; Mr. Wilson acknowledged that "Here, There, and Everywhere" was one of his favorite Beatles songs, but that the group had no influence on this music.)

"'Here (in thanks)' refers to America, where African and European musics collided," Mr. Wilson continues, "resulting in the blues, gospel music, jazz, and eventually rock; the energy of these idioms derives from the jagged rhythms, pitch sliding, and 'blue' notes not found in the common major scale. The movement conjures several of these elements.

"'There (in memoriam)' refers to the European tradition that has, over the second millennium, evolved as our classical tradition; its expressivity results primarily from rich harmonies and intricate melodies. 'In memoriam' refers particularly to those who have died in the wars and under regimes of this past century that have so shaped contemporary cultural forces." These events, that helped shaped this movement in Mr. Wilson's thoughts, included both of the 20th century's world wars, the Nazi Holocaust, and the Balkan wars of the 1990s.

Calling the finale "a real mix," the composer says further that "'Everywhere (in anticipation)' refers to musics of the rest of the world which have themselves long traditions but which - along with other facets of globalization at the millennium's end - are just beginning to enrich Western lives; the movement's main theme, in fact, is a freely-adapted Bulgarian folksong, and the solo passages draw upon several related styles. The movement's subtitle refers to the fact that music from around the world are clearly important sources for future musical explorations and syntheses - and for exciting music yet to be composed.

Performance date: February 4 & 5, 2001

Notes by Andrea Lamoreaux



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